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I’ve been hearing horror stories of the crazy storm that hit NYC on Wednesday. It brought the city to its knees, causing massive flooding and damage (not to mention also, headache).

The storm, which sent water gushing into subway tunnels and swirling over commuter railroad tracks, also unleashed a tornado that brushed Staten Island, then whipped southwestern Brooklyn with winds of up to 135 miles an hour.

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Here is the water pump system in NYC that seems to fail every single time NYC gets hit with a big storm.

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This scene above looks like it came out of Florida. But really, this is Brooklyn after a tornado landed in Sunset Park. According to the record books, this is the first time a tornado landed in Brooklyn since 1950. Yay for being a part of history in the making…I guess.

Check out more photos of NYC after this storm, here.

Australia is trying to get students to “have fun and see the world” during the “gap year” by suggesting that they join the Australian armed forces.
Totally unrelated: It’s weird not to see THE GAP when I’m out and walking about.

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These are the coolest night lights I’ve ever seen! Price: $12 USD. [via]

Whites are no longer the majority population in 1 in 10 counties in the United States, and this news is causing fear and panic in some communities. TOO BAD. SO SAD. GET OVER THE CHANGE. White is sooooooo yesterday.

And in NYC news that everybody living in NYC already knows: there are a lot of Asians.

Asians were the only major racial or ethnic group to record population gains in every county in the New York metropolitan region since 2005, according to census figures released yesterday.

The Hispanic population grew in most counties, except New York (the borough of Manhattan), Kings (Brooklyn) and Hudson in New Jersey. The number of blacks declined in every borough except Richmond (Staten Island) and in some suburban counties. Whites increased in only two counties in the region: New York and Kings.

Find out the demographics of your US neighborhood from the US Census website.